Children’s Health

Several persistent yet nonspecific symptoms have been reported in individuals who have previously recovered from infection with the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). This phenomenon has been referred to as long coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), post-COVID syndrome, and post-acute sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 infection (PASC). Although no viral load is detected in these patients,
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Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children’s Hospital have identified potent, highly specific compounds that interfere with bromodomain (BD)-containing proteins involved in cancer. The compounds, called BET BD1-inhibitors, are a starting point in the development of potentially more effective anti-cancer drugs with less side effects. The team reports in the Proceedings of the
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The rapid adoption of telemedicine and increased use of continuous glucose monitoring helped to attenuate the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on children with Type 1 diabetes, according to a new study from UT Southwestern researchers. The pandemic had profound effects on disease management when shutdowns occurred in 2020, creating barriers for those who lost
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The National Institutes of Health has launched a clinical trial testing whether a monoclonal antibody, dupilumab, can reduce asthma attacks and improve lung function and asthma symptoms in children with poorly controlled allergic asthma who live in low-income urban neighborhoods. The investigators also aim to define the activity levels of asthma-associated gene networks that correspond
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Survival has improved greatly in children with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). But a certain form of ALL that occurs mostly in babies is still very lethal, with a survival rate below 50 percent: B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia with rearrangements of the mixed lineage leukemia gene, or MLL B-ALL. Something about the biology of this type
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A National Institutes of Health-funded study has found that people with food allergies are less likely to become infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, than people without them. In addition, while previous research identified obesity as a risk factor for severe COVID-19, the new study has identified obesity and high body mass index
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A new study from researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) found that using telemedicine to evaluate patients with rare genetic conditions resulted in a similar rate of proper diagnosis as in-person visits. However, collecting genetic material from patients who are seen remotely is more challenging, suggesting there is room to improve telemedicine evaluations. The
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Immune response and the lymphatic system are central to cardiac repair after a heart attack, according to a study from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago and Northwestern University Feinberg Cardiovascular Research Institute. These insights into the basic mechanisms of cardiac repair are the first step towards developing novel therapeutic approaches to
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UCLA researchers have taken the initial step in identifying what may be an effective way to detect gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) earlier in pregnancy, potentially improving diagnosis and treatment for what is the most common disorder of pregnancy. The study is published in the peer-reviewed journal PLOS ONE. Gestational diabetes causes blood sugar levels to
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In a clinical report released on April 18, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommended resources administered by the University of Kentucky Human Development Institute (HDI) to pediatricians across the nation. These resources are recommended to be distributed by pediatricians to families learning about a prenatal diagnosis of Down syndrome. The report directs medical providers to
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A case report published in the New England Journal of Medicine provides evidence that enterovirus D68 directly infects spinal cord neurons and that a corresponding robust immune response is present – a direct causation to the polio-like paralyzing illness, acute flaccid myelitis (AFM). Matthew Vogt, MD, PhD, assistant professor of pediatrics and microbiology & immunology
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Children with high-risk neuroblastoma had worse outcomes if they were from certain racial/ethnic groups or were on public rather than private insurance, despite being treated in clinical trials with standardized protocols, according to a study led by investigators from Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center. The study shows that young patients from historically marginalized
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Antibiotics inappropriately prescribed to nonhospitalized children resulted in at least $74 million in excess health-care costs in the U.S. in 2017, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and The Pew Charitable Trusts. Children who were prescribed unneeded or unsuitable antibiotics in outpatient settings, such as doctors’ offices
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