Children’s Health

A study analyzing prescription claims for a drug used to treat opioid addictions found that adolescents and young adults were less likely than usual to get treatment during the COVID-19 pandemic, especially if they were covered by private, commercial health insurance. The findings of the study, conducted by researchers at Johns Hopkins Children’s Center and
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A new multidisciplinary study conducted by researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center has found that the co-development of three systems, the gut microbiome, respiratory system and immune system, is correlated with a baby’s respiratory health, and an infant can have negative respiratory outcomes if the development of one of these systems is disrupted.
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Physicians at Stanford Medicine have developed a way to provide pediatric kidney transplants without immune-suppressing drugs. Their key innovation is a safe method to transplant the donor’s immune system to the patient before surgeons implant the kidney. The medical team has named the two-transplant combination a “dual immune/solid organ transplant,” or DISOT. A scientific paper
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With modern life’s high speed and high-stress levels, it is not surprising that psychosomatic disorders are on the rise. Especially common are gut disorders like irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) that have been linked to aberrant gut-brain axis communication – abdominal pain-related disorders of gut-brain interaction (AP-DGBI). Study: Risk Factors for Abdominal Pain Disorders of Gut
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Pediatric Emergency Department (ED) encounters related to physical abuse decreased by 19 percent during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a multicenter study published in the journal Pediatrics. While encounter rates with lower clinical severity dropped during the pandemic, encounter rates with higher clinical severity remained unchanged. This pattern raises concern for unrecognized harm, as opposed
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Surface sampling for SARS-CoV-2 RNA has shown promise to detect the exposure of environments to infected individuals shedding the virus who would not otherwise be detected. Now a new study, published in mSystems, an open access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, shows that the methodology used to detect COVID-19 in nasal swabs at
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Eating disorders are often misunderstood as lifestyle choices gone awry or oversimplified as the unfortunate result of societal pressures. These misconceptions obscure the fact that eating disorders are serious and potentially fatal mental illnesses that can be treated effectively with early intervention. Mortality rates for people with eating disorders are high compared to other mental
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Several months ago, a lab technologist at Barnes-Jewish Hospital mixed the blood components of two people: Alphonso Harried, who needed a kidney, and Pat Holterman-Hommes, who hoped to give him one. The goal was to see whether Harried’s body would instantly see Holterman-Hommes’ organ as a major threat and attack it before surgeons could finish
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Researchers have known for some time that maternal breast milk provides critical nutrients for newborns, and antibodies from mothers vaccinated against a specific disease-causing bacterium or virus can be transferred via breast milk to babies. Now a new preclinical study by Weill Cornell Medicine investigators shows that one specific set of antibodies that is induced
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Transgender individuals are more likely to experience discrimination, isolation, and lack of social support. This, along with negative psychosocial challenges, such as being denied access to gender-neutral restrooms, combined with being a college student, and you have what associate professor of neurology, Shelley Hershner M.D., calls “a perfect storm” that can contribute to sleep disorders
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Analyzing brain stem cells of patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), Rutgers scientists have found evidence of irregularities in very early brain development that may contribute to the neuropsychiatric disorder. The findings support a concept scientists have long suspected: ASD arises early in fetal development during the period when brain stem cells divide to form
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